Cameo Glass Wall Mirror, ca. 1890.

Posted by on Jun 7, 2012 in Thomas Webb and Sons | 0 comments

Cameo Glass Wall Mirror, ca. 1890.

Cameo Glass Wall Mirror, ca. 1890. This remarkable object is by Thomas Webb & Sons, with the characteristic pattern of dog roses in opal over ruby, on a large circular plaque. The plaque is drilled to take a central domed mirror, the whole contained in a thumb-moulded beech frame. This would have been destined for a large wealthy household, furnished in the fashionable ‘Aesthetic’ taste.

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Whitefriars Limited Edition Goblet, 1953

Posted by on Jun 7, 2012 in White Friars | 1 comment

Whitefriars Limited Edition Goblet, 1953

The red, white and blue twist stem, the bowl engraved with the Royal Cipher and the date 2nd. June 1953 was originally designed for the Coronation of the Queen’s father in 1936. The goblets were blown by Frank Hill, and the diamond-point engraving executed by William Wilson. The underside of the pontil is engraved ‘Whitefriars No. 278.’ It is unsure how many were actually made.

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Verre de Soire Double Gourd Vase

Posted by on Jun 7, 2012 in French Glass | 1 comment

Verre de Soire Double Gourd Vase

Verre de Soire Double Gourd Vase, late 19th. cent. A remarkable piece of glass-blowing, decorated with ruby and gold spiralled bands, over an opaque white base. This may have been a test piece, the pontil being rather carelessly polished out, and the marks of the jacks separating the two chambers being very obvious. There are no other similar vases known.

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Half-Pint Tankard by Michael Harris

Posted by on Jun 7, 2012 in Isle of Wight Studio Glass | 0 comments

Half-Pint Tankard by Michael Harris

Half-Pint Tankard by Michael Harris, Isle of Wight Studio Glass. Summer, 1983. This ‘Black Azurene’ finish was developed in 1978 incorporationg 22 carat gold and silver leaf. It was this design process which changed the fortunes of Michael Harris, and is one of the most iconic ranges produced by his studio. The extreme cost of making this glass meant it had very limited sales, and it was made for one season only in the summer of 1983. Examples are excessively rare.

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Fair Trade Port Bottle

Posted by on Apr 2, 2012 in Bottles | 2 comments

Fair Trade Port Bottle

Mid 18th. century dark brown bottle with pontil base, showing the modern shape which was just coming in at this time, recovered from the sailing barque “Peggy”, which foundered in 1784.   The sailing barque “Peggy” was engaged in the transhipment of French wine and brandy, and re-bottling it in port bottles in order to avoid the full rate of excise duty, on the orders of a Renfrew merchant, Mr. Duncan. Sailing from Portugal in 1784, the barque reached the western coast of Scotland, having been detected and pursued by the Excise men. The skipper tried to put some of his cargo...

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Bottle with Original Contents 2

Posted by on Apr 2, 2012 in Bottles | 0 comments

Bottle with Original Contents 2

This is of the early 18th. century, recovered from the wreck of the Dutch East India Merchantman “T’Vliegenthart”, which foundered in 1735. It is difficult to say if this bottle is of Dutch or English make.

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Bottle with Original Contents 1

Posted by on Apr 2, 2012 in Bottles | 0 comments

Bottle with Original Contents 1

This bottle dates from the 17th. century, and is typically onion shaped with a pontil base and iridescent surface. The top is sealed, retaining its original contents.

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Extra Large Bowl and Vase

Posted by on Jul 18, 2011 in Irish and Waterford Crystal | 0 comments

Extra Large Bowl and Vase

This matching vase and bowl, designed for use together as a punch bowl, or separately as displayed, is something of a puzzle. It was bought originally in the early 1930s as Waterford glass, and the thickness of the walls and the characteristic patterns of the cutting, are typical of early to mid nineteenth century work, but the shape of the vase and bowl suggest a much later date. It may derive from one of the many small glass-works which flourished in and around the city during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

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Dessert Glass, ca. 1740

Posted by on Jul 18, 2011 in Miscellaneous and Unidentified Glass | 0 comments

Dessert Glass, ca. 1740

This extremely rare glass with a rib-moulded narrow bell-shaped bowl has an applied B-shaped scroll handle over a flattened knop and panel-moulded dome foot. (Tim Udell illustrates an identical glass in his article ‘Glasses for the Dessert’ Glass Circle Journal 5, 1986, which he describes as rare and knows of no other example.)

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Three Colour Cameo Vase, ca. 1890

Posted by on Jul 18, 2011 in Thomas Webb and Sons | 0 comments

Three Colour Cameo Vase, ca. 1890

The ovoid form of similar citron tint to the above large example, with a slender waisted neck and flared rim, encased in ruby and opaque white, carved with a spray of dog-roses and a butterfly, with banding on the everted foot and rim.

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Medieval Inscribed Glass Jug, ca. 12th.-14th.cent

Posted by on Jul 18, 2011 in Ancient Medieval & Post Medieval Glass | 0 comments

Medieval Inscribed Glass Jug, ca. 12th.-14th.cent

Mould-blown in pale green with dark blue bands to shoulder, neck and rim, the body globular with moulded text, the neck tubular with a flared rim and round section handle. This typical jug is in remarkably fine condition.

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Roman Glass Vessel Group, ca. 2nd.-3rd. cent. A.D

Posted by on Jul 18, 2011 in Ancient Medieval & Post Medieval Glass | 0 comments

Roman Glass Vessel Group, ca. 2nd.-3rd. cent. A.D

The blue and green glass jars, with flared necks and rims, include pinched decoration and detail and moulded leaf-pattern to the bodies, and the bases have a concave centre which allows the piece to stand firmly. All, save the two round bottomed flasks with everted rims, which would possibly have been used for sprinkling powder or flavourings, were probably used as containers for oil, and are associated with Roman and Hellenistic cemetery sites.

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Medieval Rock Crystal Reliquary

Posted by on Jul 18, 2011 in Ancient Medieval & Post Medieval Glass | 0 comments

Medieval Rock Crystal Reliquary

This extremely rare and fine Fatimid/Mesopotamian crystal jar, (dating to ca. 800-900 A.D.) was re-used in the 12th.-13th. century A.D. as a reliquary. The cylindrical crystal vessel has ribbed bands cut to the upper body and a turned foot; the aperture sealed with a red wax-based compound. Such crystal vessels were commonly looted during the Crusades, and re-used to hold Christian relics, many of them ending up in European Cathedrals. See B.W. Robinson, Islamic Art in the Keir Collection, p.289 for further discussion of this example.

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Sweetmeat Glass, English, ca. 1685

Posted by on Jul 18, 2011 in Ancient Medieval & Post Medieval Glass | 1 comment

Sweetmeat Glass, English, ca. 1685

The flared bowl with folded rim and moulded gadrooned base, is presented on a triple-knopped stem and folded conical foot. A transitional piece, moving from the ‘Venetian’ style of glass fashionable up to the mid-17th. century, it is an early piece in the newly discovered ‘flint’ or lead crystal, which was to make English glass pre-eminent in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. See Keith Kelsall, The Footed Salver p.65, for a discussion of a very similar example.

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Epergne in Silver Wire-work holder, 1905, Birmingham

Posted by on Jul 18, 2011 in Epergnes and Tazzas | 0 comments

Epergne in Silver Wire-work holder, 1905, Birmingham

The glass, cased green with white trailing is most likely to have been made in Stourbridge, and is of exceptional quality. The manufacturer of the silver wirework holder is unknown, the maker’s mark being unclear. The design owes much to the Arts and Crafts movement, and is likely to have been manufactured by a small crafts worker, rather than the output from a large firm. The modest size and simplification of this example shows how radically design had changed from the previous ornate examples of high Victorian style.

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Epergne in Vaseline glass, probably by Stuart and Sons Ca. 1900

Posted by on Jul 18, 2011 in Epergnes and Tazzas | 0 comments

Epergne in Vaseline glass, probably by Stuart and Sons Ca. 1900

This restrained example shows the influence of the Art Nouveau movement, and the gradual simplification of glass design at the end of the nineteenth century, for which Stuart became noted.

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Epergne with Vaseline glass and blue edging

Posted by on Jul 18, 2011 in Epergnes and Tazzas | 0 comments

Epergne with Vaseline glass and blue edging

Maker uncertain, possibly Richardsons. It is unusual to find an Epergne in this colour combination – blue rather fell out of favour during the mid-nineteenth century. The ‘box-pleated’ rather than frilled edge is also highly unusual.

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Cranberry Epergne, ca. 1860-1880, probably by Richardsons of Stourbridge

Posted by on Jul 18, 2011 in Epergnes and Tazzas | 1 comment

Cranberry Epergne, ca. 1860-1880, probably by Richardsons of Stourbridge

Cranberry was one of the most popular colours in the mid-nineteenth century, although stories of the glass works owner ‘improving’ the colour by tossing a gold sovereign into the pot are just stories, and have no basis in fact. This pattern is typical of the hundreds of similar epergnes produced in the Victorian period, right up to the First World War, but which are now increasingly rare, because of their fragility.

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Glass Comport and Tazza, 1864, by Molineaux & Webb

Posted by on Jul 18, 2011 in Epergnes and Tazzas | 1 comment

Glass Comport and Tazza, 1864, by Molineaux & Webb

The factory was situated in Ancoats, Manchester, and until its demise in 1929 was owned and run by the Webb family. (They were no relation to the Stourbridge dynasty of the same name.)

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Plain Cut Glass Tazza, ca. 1830. Maker unknown, possibly Irish

Posted by on Jul 18, 2011 in Epergnes and Tazzas | 0 comments

Plain Cut Glass Tazza, ca. 1830. Maker unknown, possibly Irish

Unusually, this large elevated tazza has a perfectly plain un-cut foot, which may indicate it was designed to be placed in a shallow bowl or on another tazza, so that its plain foot would have been hidden by a further display of fruit or flowers.

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